The Educational Railroading Conference Leader Since 1994

26th ANNUAL WHEEL RAIL INTERACTION CONFERENCE

2020 Rail Transit Session

Abstract:

Using Simulation and Field Data to Increase Crossover Diverging Speeds for Bilevel Passenger Cars

Alvin Law

Alvin Law
AECOM

Alireza Babaee

Alireza Babaee
AECOM

This paper presents the simulation assessment of enhancing increasing mainline diverging speeds by using longer crossovers with spiral-arc-spiral turnouts. The project is situated within the transit corridors of the Greater Toronto & Hamilton Area in Ontario, Canada. The upgrade from No. 20 crossovers to longer No. 24 crossovers will increase overall network capacity by allowing commuter trains to increase passing speed from 45 mph to 70 mph. The overall goal of the assessment was to ensure that the transition to higher speed transit was safe and did not adversely affect passenger comfort. The first stage involved analyzing recorded accelerometer and inclinometer data of an empty Bilevel passenger car diverging on multiple No. 20 crossovers. The data was analyzed to assess the existing acceleration, jerk, and passenger comfort levels. The second stage involved developing a dynamic simulation model in VAMPIRE that represented the No. 20 crossover, Bilevel passenger car, and track parameters from the first stage. To validate the model, the recorded data was used to calibrate the Bilevel car model inputs as required. The third stage involved simulation of a proposed crossover design with a No. 24 frog, spiral-arc-spiral design, rail cant and movable frog using the calibrated Bilevel car model inputs from the second stage. This paper shares the findings during the measured and simulated stages, challenges encountered, as well as the solutions developed to ensure an accurate and beneficial simulation scope with real-world applicability. Both crossovers were simulated with empty and fully loaded Bilevel car models and their dynamic response data was analyzed including acceleration and jerk in all axes, seated and standing comfort indexes, safety criteria, and rail force values.